Scotland

Very Scientific Poll


I am on holiday to recharge my batteries. Back on the 30th of July.

Meantime…

Please answer poll questions 1 and 2.
You may only vote once for each question.

1: Should Scotland be an Independent Country?

2: If eligible, do you intend to vote on September 18th?

These are not scientific polls.

If you are unsure whether you are eligible to vote in the Scottish Independence Referendum, or are registered to vote – visit aboutmyvote.co.uk

 

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Sidney Godolphin, 1st Earl of Godolphin by Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt

Alien Act 1705


Just in case you’re wondering how Scotland got into this Union called the United Kingdom, here’s a brief history lesson.

We were blackmailed into it.

In a nutshell, the Aliens Act threatened that unless Scotland agreed to negotiate terms for union and accepted the Hanoverian succession by 25 December 1705, there would be a ban on the import of all Scottish staple products into England. Scots would also lose the privileges of Englishmen under English law – thus endangering rights to any property they held in England. In essence – political, religious and economic blackmail.

The legislation was called the Alien Act. You can find more information about its here on Wikipedia and at the UK Parliament.

Better together, then or now? Naw.

Those who forget history are doomed to repeat it.

The prize is a better country for the people of Scotland. And that’s only 61 days away.

Image credit: Sidney Godolphin, 1st Earl of Godolphin by Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt, courtesy of National Portrait Gallery, London

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We zip up the back


Time for a little parliamentary roundup:

  • As a mighty total of 51 members of the Westminster parliament opposed an “emergency” Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Bill, that, contrary to European law, forces telephone and internet companies to retain data on your use of their services for years, we are also informed that the Royal Family is hereby granted complete secrecy. About everything they do, or may have done in the past. It’s a closed book. The DRIP bill has had no parliamentary scrutiny or prior public debate. It’s just landed and been passed into law. Every SNP MP opposed the bill.

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